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Raspberry TartI had a fist-sized ball of shortcrust pastry and a small glass of the sweet almond cream left in the fridge. By the time I got around to baking a tart again children ate all the apricots. Which turned out to be a good thing. This time around I used raspberries. Sweet almond tones down raspberries’ sharpness but doesn’t get in the way of the fruity and floral flavor.

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Over the last couple of days I read several blogs where people struggled with getting the pastry baked through for their tarts, so I wanted to show you what I did.

  1. Buttered the form, in particular all corners and indentations – I really wanted to make sure I will get the tart out of the form
  2. Rolled out the left-over pastry as thin as I could and laid it over the baking tin without pushing it too hard into the creases
  3. Cut the pastry overhanging bits. To my surprise it actually shrunk once baked. Next time I won’t cut the overhang until after the cake is ready to be served
  4. Lined the raw pastry with a large piece of baking paper and filled the tart form with millet (my version of blind baking beans)
  5. Baked it for 15 minutes on 200 C, removed the lining and baked it for another 10 minutes. I wanted the based to be nearly baked through as the fargipane cream doesn’t’ need long to set and I didn’t want to cook the raspberries into a compote.

Raspberry tart

If you missed it, have  a look at the recipe of the almond cream and the glaze to finish the tart off in my earlier post.

Now – my husband and mother-in-law can be biased. But a 3,5 year old will never lie about your cooking!

This version of the french tart has more sing then the Apricot tart version. Because raspberries are smaller then halved apricots it’s easier to eat. It’s a perfect picnic tart!

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